Sail Fast!

Just Imagine by John A

Posted by George Stevens on Tue, Mar 10, 2015 @ 02:56 PM

Just imagine if if all sailing facilities across North America and beyond threw open their doors and invited the public to experience sailing on the longest day of the year right at the start of summer!  And then publicized it all in their local area - on Craig's List, in the local paper, in a Blog, Facebook and Twitter Feed.  All sailboats, all sailing, all together.  Summer Sailstice is the opportunity for everyone to do this for this year's 15th annual Summer Sailstice.

We always love seeing more sailing organizations coming on board to just do it so it's great to find a post on the Washington DC area Craig's List for Mariner Sailing School in Alexandria, VA.  

Mariner Sailing School is publicizing free one-hour sailing lessons on Craig's List.

The Summer Sailstice events page now has two options for posting your event:  Public Participation events with yellow pins are events open to the public.  Red pins are demonstration events, i.e.  cruises, races and other events which showcase the best of sailing but where public participation isn't available.  

We'd like to see as many events as possible on Summer Sailstice so all of sailing is on display and we especially like seeing US Sailing training centers like Mariner Sailing School offering open houses and other opportunities for uninitiated sailors to get on the water.  

Tags: Belle Haven Marina, Washington Sailing Marina, Clean Marina, adult sailing lessons, Mariner Sailing School, US Sailing, Sunfish, sailing lessons for children, Washington DC sailing marina

Become “Boat Smart”

Posted by George Stevens on Fri, Mar 06, 2015 @ 09:40 PM

 

education and training

Learning the basics of boat operation and safety is best done before your first trip to the marina or launch ramp. In fact, a number of states require powerboat operators to take a boating education course and carry a license or certificate proving successful course completion any time they're underway.

Resources for You!

The US Coast Guard Auxiliary was established by Congress in 1939, the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is Semper Paratus(Always Ready).

US Power Squadron was organized in 1914, USPS is a non profit, educational organization dedicated to making boating safer and more enjoyable by teaching classes in seamanship, navigation and related subjects.

Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS) has worked to provide quality service, savings, and representation to the boating community since 1966. The BoatUS Foundation is the only FREE online safety course developed specifically for individual states.

Safely Moored is a professional, hands-on boating instruction, safety training, yacht management, dockside services & Yacht Sales in South Florida.

US POWERBOATING™ is the nation's leading, on-the-water organization, offering courses for powerboat operators and is an affiliate of US SAILING, the national governing body for the sport of sailing.

The Recreational Powerboating Association™ (RPBA™) is the leading authority for hands-on powerboat instruction, powerboat certification & powerboat schools in the United States.

The American Sailing Association (ASA) is the oldest and largest keelboat certification authority in the United States, with 300 affiliated sailing schools worldwide.

The United States Sailing Association (US Sailing), the national governing body for sailing, provides leadership, integrity, and growth for the sport in the United States.

The US Sailing Keelboat Certification System is a cooperative effort among sailing schools, charter companies, the sailing industry, and US Sailing volunteers and staff.

Tags: Belle Haven Marina, Potomac River sailing, boating safety, Alexandria Virginia, Boat US, Mariner Sailing School, sailing lessons for children, Sailing Instructors

Peer-to-Peer Boat Rentals: What Do You Need To Know?

Posted by George Stevens on Tue, Feb 24, 2015 @ 03:50 PM

 

10 Tips From BoatUS for Owners and Renters

ALEXANDRIA, Va., February 24, 2015 – Airbnb may a popular “peer-to-peer” lodging site on the web, but if you want to rent a boat in your local area or away, you’ve got options, too. Boatbound.com, Boatsetter.com and Cruzin.com are just a few of the new crop of online websites offering a chance to rent a boat for the day or weekend. These services, which connect private boat owners to renters, can help owners recoup some expenses, and can also give non-owners a chance to get on the water with friends without the cost of full-time ownership. So what do you need to know? Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS) has some information for both boat owners and renters.

  1. Renters do not want boats that are not safe and or can barely get out of the marina, so these services are often better suited to newer vessels less than 10 years old. Older, larger or faster boats may require a survey or inspection. Rental costs vary widely based on boat size and location, and renters typically are required to have some boating experience as well as a deposit.
  2. These peer-to-peer boat rental websites generally handle every part of the transaction, including taking deposits and payments. They typically take 30%-40% of the rental fee, which covers overhead, profit, as well as insurance and on water towing services (more on both of those in a second…read on).
  3. For boat owners, most boat insurance policies don’t provide coverage during the rental period and some companies may not provide coverage at any time simply if you list your boat with a rental program. If you happen to own and insure your boat but desire to rent another, your insurance company (including BoatUS Marine Insurance) may offer a temporary endorsement for liability coverage while operating the rental boat – but damage to the rental boat still is not covered. That’s why these “peer-to-peer” boat rental companies often provide additional insurance coverage. However, it’s up to owners – and renters – to read the fine print. For owners, know what happens if your boat is damaged, the claims process, how depreciation may figure in, and, in the event of total loss, how the insurance will value your boat. For renters, ensure you are OK with the level of liability coverage being offered during the rental, know how much you would have to pay if you damage the boat, and whether injuries to both you and your passengers would be covered.
  4. TowBoatUS and Vessel Assist towing fleets provide on water towing and assistance service to some peer-to-peer rental services at no additional charge to the renter or owner. For the renter that means simply calling BoatUS’ 24-hour nationwide dispatch (800-391-4869) if there is a breakdown.
  5. Renters need to ask about any other costs or fees, including fuel or other charges like pump-outs. They should also clarify with the owner what happens if the boat breaks down and becomes unusable.
  6. Boat owners have the full right to say “no” to a renter, starting with an initial phone call. BoatUS member Bob Kellet, who has successfully rented his 30-foot sailboat, says owners are in full control of the process, from pricing to vetting renters. After speaking to a potential renter on the phone, if he’s comfortable, Kellet will meet at his boat for a full run-through. He may even take the renter out for a few minutes to show how everything works.
  7. Kellet also suggests having a detailed instruction guide for the boat’s equipment and a step-by-step guide for things like starting the engine. Be sure to include safety gear.
  8. Having a walk-through, pre-rental checklist is good for both parties, as is taking a few date-stamped photos showing the condition of the vessel.
  9. While there is a certain element of trust, owner and renter reviews tend to weed out bad apples quickly, so be sure to check the renter’s history or the owner’s reviews from past renters. “Reviews are the best indicator of whether there will be a positive rental experience,” says BoatUS Consumer Affairs Director Charles Fort, who adds, “These services may also help those looking to buy a certain boat to try it out, if you will, before they purchase.”
  10. One man’s experience: BoatUS Member Kellet said he was apprehensive the first few times he rented his sailboat to a stranger, but after a couple rentals he realized the renters cared about his boat, too, and they were there for the same reason: a love of the water and boating. A couple rentals a month easily pays his Seattle, Washington, area moorage fees. The only downside Kellet reports are scheduling conflicts when he’d like to use the boat himself.

Tags: Belle Haven Marina, Learn to Sail, boating, boating, Potomac River, boating safety, Boat US, Mariner Sailing School, Safety

Top 10 Reasons I Love To Sail with my Family ~by Beth Crabtree

Posted by George Stevens on Mon, Mar 31, 2014 @ 09:42 PM

 

Photo by Dan Phelps

Photo by Dan Phelps

1. Sailing is one of the best forms of family bonding. Because multiple generations can sail together and teamwork is a necessity, few sports bring families together the way sailing does.

2. One of the best parts of sailing is that there are so few electronic distractions. Although our kids bring their phones aboard, they only use them for photos and music.

3. Limited space and 360 degrees of surrounding water mean that it’s hard for teens to hide. Sailing can bring even the most reclusive teen topside for some quality time with the family.

4. Sailing provides time for daydreaming and reflection. On a sailboat, the work comes in bursts. You’ll have moments where the whole crew is intensely busy, but you’ll also have long stretches of time when each family member can retreat into his or her own thoughts.

5. Sailing with my spouse is an ideal date. Spending time on the water away from work, household, and parenting responsibilities is a great way to relax and recharge.

6. Sailing is a great place to watch sibling interaction. Although they may squabble on land, they’ve got to work together to make the boat go.

7. Some of my fondest childhood memories are the hours my dad and I spent sailing. I hope my children will feel the same way someday.

8. Sailing is full of teaching moments. Crew work requires interpersonal skills, but sailing also provides a platform for parents to teach proper planning, accountability, engineering, math, chart reading, ecology, and more.

9. Sailing with children gives them an opportunity to see parents as individuals, not just as Mom and Dad. One of the interesting dynamics on a sailboat is the sense of equality among the sailors aboard. Skills matter more than age.

10. Sailing keeps our hands and our minds busy. It gets us out in nature. We leave our worries and commitments back on land. We come home tired and happy. Sailing is a mini family vacation.

~by Beth Crabtree

Tags: Belle Haven Marina, Flying Scot, Learn to Sail, adult sailing lessons, Mariner Sailing School, sailing lessons for children

Mount Vernon-Lee Chamber of Commerce on Belle Haven Marina

Posted by George Stevens on Tue, Mar 18, 2014 @ 03:00 PM

Comments of Mount Vernon-Lee Chamber of Commerce
Regarding EIS No. 20140006 Draft EIS, NPS, VA,
Dyke Marsh Wetland Restoration and
Long-term Management Plan

March 17, 2014


Mount Vernon-Lee Chamber of Commerce is the premier business organization for the south
Fairfax area with more than 350 members. On behalf of our members we would like to
register our concerns with the implementation of the Dyke Marsh Restoration and Long Term
Management Plan and in particular language contained in Alternative C, the Preferred
Alternative presented by the National Park Service (NPS). Preserving and maintaining Belle
Haven Marina is a top community concern and implementation of Alternative C does not
clearly state the continued operation of this business. Belle Haven mooring area

Dyke Marsh and Belle Haven Marina are both popular recreation destinations and a critical
launching and mooring field for boaters in the Washington area. The two destinations are
from a geographical sense, bound to each other. The marina provides a boat ramp, slips,
sailboat rental, paddle craft rental and launch, and a sailing school. Area residents launch
boats and paddle craft to fish, bird-watch and enjoy the wildlife fostered by Dyke Marsh. The
marina also serves important education programs such as the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s
Potomac River Program which teaches youth conservation and preservation.

The vitality of both Dyke Marsh and Belle Haven Marina rely on a balanced management plan
that fosters the sustainability of the marsh and the economic viability of the marina.
However, current language contained in Alternative C could curtail or eliminate marina
operations. This language should be removed from Alternative C:

“This alternative contains an optional 20-acre restoration cell in the area currently serving as
mooring for the marina. Such an option would only be implemented should the marina
concession no longer be economically viable for the current concessioner, and no other
concessioner expresses interest in taking over the business, eliminating the need for the
mooring field.” Dyke Marsh Wetland Restoration and Long-term Management Plan / EIS,
page 37.

The National Park Service is the leaseholder to the concessionaire (in this case Belle Haven
Marina) and sets the lease requirements, insurance minimums, and defines what is or is not
“economic viability.” Language in the Draft ESI leads to the conclusion that the
concessionaire could be denied renewal of the lease at any time. A consistent and fair
approach to Belle Haven Marina will keep this business open to serve the community. Belle
Haven Marina is and has been consistently at 100% slip occupancy with more than 400
families on the waiting list for slips. This is important testimony towards the need to maintain
the 20 acres of current mooring field. The marina and sailing school also contribute heavily
to the local economy by providing 45-50 jobs and support nearby retail and restaurants.

Closing Belle Haven Marina would mean no public boat launch for more than 20 miles of the
Potomac River even though the nation’s taxpayers, through the National Park System, pay for
a good stretch of maintaining that river shore. Placing the access this marina provides to
the urban and suburban population in such jeopardy also directly conflicts with National Park
Service initiatives to remove obstacles to park access.

It is important to recognize the importance of maintaining the connection to the water that
facilities such as Belle Haven Marina provide, particularly in an urban area such as
Washington. For disadvantaged youth, on the water experiences are only made possible by
supporting recreational facilities like the marina.

We strongly urge the National Park Service to eliminate language in the Preferred Alternative
that puts in jeopardy the continued operation of Belle Haven Marina. The goal of continued
operation of Belle Haven Marina should be clearly stated in the EIS. There is a balance to be
found in providing access to Dyke Marsh and the Potomac River while preserving the very
elements that make these natural areas such attractive destinations. Preserving public
access to the marsh and river via support and enhancement of the Belle Haven Marina must
be a primary goal of any new management plan.

Additionally, dredging of Belle Haven Marina and the use of such dredge material to rebuild
eroded areas of Dyke Marsh would be a win-win strategy in moving forward and supporting
both entities. Creating deeper slips and mooring areas will help to solidify the area for
generations to come, while the use of native soils as fill to restore Dyke Marsh will cut down
in refurbishment costs.

In conclusion, Mount Vernon-Lee Chamber of Commerce strongly urges the National Park
Service to 1) eliminate the referenced language in the DRAFT EIS, 2) add language that
guarantees the continued operation of Belle Haven Marina, and 3) dredge Belle Haven
Marina and use this material as fill as part of the restoration process. Preserving both Belle
Haven Marina and Dyke Marsh and the recreational and educational opportunities they
provide are important community goals and can be accomplished during this process.


6821 Richmond Highway / Alexandria, VA 22306
www.MtVernon-LeeChamber.org

Tags: Belle Haven Marina, sailing lessons, boating, Mariner Sailing School

Dyke Marsh Wetland Restoration, Comments of BoatU.S

Posted by George Stevens on Fri, Mar 14, 2014 @ 04:45 PM

Comments of BoatU.S. regarding EIS No. 20140006
Draft EIS, NPS, VA,
Dyke Marsh Wetland Restoration and
Long-term Management Plan

March 14, 2014

BoatU.S. is the largest organization of recreational boat owners in the
United States, with more than 500,000 members nationwide and over 51,000
members in Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia. On behalf of our
members we would like to register our concerns with the implementation of the
Dyke Marsh Restoration and Long Term Management Plan and in particular
language contained in Alternative C, the alternative preferred by the National
Park Service (NPS).

Dyke Marsh and Belle Haven Marina are both a popular boating
destination and a critical launching and mooring field for boaters in the
Washington area. The two destinations are from a geographical sense, bound to
each other. The marina provides a boat ramp, slips, sailboat rental, paddle craft
rental and launch, and a sailing school. Area residents launch boats and paddle
craft to fish, bird-watch and enjoy the wildlife fostered by Dyke Marsh. The
marina serves education programs such as the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s
Potomac River Program which teaches conservation and preservation.

It is our strong belief that the vitality of both Dyke Marsh and Belle Haven
Marina rely on a balanced management plan that fosters the sustainability of the
marsh and the economic viability of the marina. Currently language contained in
Alternative C could very easily inhibit or possibly end the prosperity of the
marina. We propose that the following language be removed from Alternative C:

“This alternative contains an optional 20-acre restoration cell in the area
currently serving as mooring for the marina. Such an option would only be
implemented should the marina concession no longer be economically
viable for the current concessioner, and no other concessioner expresses
interest in taking over the business, eliminating the need for the mooring
field.”

Since the NPS is not only the leaseholder to the concessionaire (in this
case Belle Haven Marina) but also sets the lease requirements, insurance
minimums, and defines what is or is not “economic viability,” we believe that the
concessionaire could be denied renewal of the lease at any time. Just over the
last 3 years, the insurance required by NPS has increased from $1,000,000 to 
$5,000,000. Even in the face of such drastic increases, Belle Haven Marina is
and has been consistently at 100% slip occupancy with over 400 families on the
waiting list for slips. This is important testimony towards the need to maintain the
20 acres of current mooring field. The marina and sailing school also contribute
heavily to the local economy by providing 45-50 jobs.

Should this marina be closed there would be no public boat launch for
over 20 miles of the Potomac River even though the nation’s taxpayers, through
the National Park System, pay for a good stretch of maintaining that river shore.
Placing the access this marina provides to the urban and suburban population in
such jeopardy also directly conflicts with President Obama’s America’s Great
Outdoors Initiative (AGO) to remove obstacles to park access. A key
recommendation to come out of the President’s AGO initiative is the following
(emphasis added):

Recommendation 2.1 — Support outdoor recreation access and
opportunities on public lands by establishing a Federal Interagency
Committee on Outdoor Recreation

It is important to recognize the importance of maintaining the connection
to the water that facilities such as Belle Haven Marina provide, particularly in an
urban area such as Washington. For disadvantaged youth, on the water
experiences are only made possible by having this kind of recreational facility
supported. All of the alternative management proposals limit access for the public
and the recreational boater, a management philosophy that directly contradicts
the intent of the AGO initiative.

President Obama followed through on the AGO recommendation on June
13, 2011, when he created the Federal Interagency Council on Outdoor
Recreation headed by former Secretary Salazar. As a stakeholder organization
that is actively engaged in the AGO process, we note several tasks charged to
the new Council that are of particular significance in our review of the Dyke
Marsh Restoration Plan:

Task: Coordinate recreation management, access and policies across
multiple agencies to improve public enjoyment and recreational use of
federal lands.

Task: Improve engagement of young people and their families in outdoor
recreation through healthy, active lifestyles.

Task: Identify ways to improve access to and benefits from our parks,
refuges, and other public lands, waters, and shores for persons with
disabilities.

Task: Target underserved and disadvantaged communities for both
access and engagement in the benefits of and opportunities for outdoor
recreation.

We urge the Park Service to revisit its plans for Dyke Marsh with an eye
towards meeting the national recommendations contained in the AGO initiative.
The aforementioned language in Alternative C, could strongly jeopardize the
attainability of these goals.

We appreciate the delicate balance the NPS must strike in fulfilling its
mission of providing access to Dyke Marsh and the Potomac River while
preserving the very elements that make these natural areas such attractive
destinations. With their close proximity to metropolitan Washington, preserving
public access to the marsh and river via support and enhancement of the Belle
Haven Marina must be a primary goal of any new management plan.

Additionally, we believe that the dredging of Belle Haven Marina and the
use of such dredge material to rebuild eroded areas of Dyke Marsh would be a
win-win strategy in moving forward and supporting both entities. Creating deeper
slips and mooring areas will help to solidify the area for generations to come,
while the use of native soils as fill to restore Dyke Marsh will cut down in
refurbishment costs.

As this process moves to the final stages, BoatU.S. strongly believes that
a resolution can be reached that both maintains public access to the water while
preserving the very outdoors experience our mem

Tags: Belle Haven Marina, Potomac River, Clean Marina, Dyke Marsh, Boat US, Mariner Sailing School

Gary Jobson - 34th America's Cup

Posted by George Stevens on Thu, Mar 13, 2014 @ 03:27 PM
raft up st michaels resized 600
Chesapeake Multihull Association is fortunate to have Gary Jobson - a top-tier personality in the world of sailing - make a presentation on March 30.  He has a talent for telling a story and he comes with terrific audio-visual support courtesy of NBC and ESPN.  The presentation will include:
 
 ·       34th America's Cup  (about half of the program)
 
 This proved to be one of the most exciting comebacks in all of sports. Commentating for NBC, Gary Jobson, was on the water every day for the Louis Vuitton Challenger Trials and the America’s Cup broadcasting live. Gary will present an exclusive inside look of this amazing story.
 
·       Setting Speed Sailing Records
 
·       Sailing Classic Yachts 
 
·       Unfurling the World:  The Voyages of Irving and Electa Johnson
 
·       Racing Highlights that includes:  Vendee Globe, Volvo Ocean Race, Kite Boarding, Crash and burn (always fun)
 
·       Gary's favorite stories laced throughout the program
 
In addition Gary will present a preview of his new film, Unfurling the World, the Voyages of Irving and Exy Johnson 1933 -1958, also a feature on speed sailing: the quest to be the fastest sailboat on the water.
 
Location:  Southern High School, 4400 Solomons Island Road, Harwood MD 20776
 
Time: 2:00 - 4:00 PM
 
Free to all, but donations to CBYRA are quite welcome

Tags: Belle Haven Marina, boating, Mariner Sailing School, Sailboat racing, US Sailing

Flying Scot - By Jack Hornor (Boat US editor)

Posted by George Stevens on Wed, Feb 26, 2014 @ 10:33 AM

Flying Scot

Revised by BoatUS editors in October 2012

Flying ScotWhen I speak with sailors and prospective sailors, I am often asked what I would recommend as a good "starter boat" for a beginning sailor. I have toyed with the idea of a "10 best" or similar review but have found there are far too many variables to cover the subject in a column. However, if I were to compile a "10 best" list the Flying Scot would most certainly be included. Among the many reasons I would pick the Flying Scot is that many who chose her for their first sailboat have found her to be the only boat they ever needed. When one boat can provide a lifetime of sailing enjoyment, it's a special boat.

Gordon K. "Sandy" Douglas, the dean of U.S. planing dinghy designers, designed the Flying Scot in 1956 after nearly 40 years of designing and building boats. Douglas had designed and built the 17-foot Thistle in 1945 and followed that with the 20-foot Highlander class in 1951. The Thistle class met with almost immediate success and remains an active racing class today. Although less successful than the Thistle, the Highlander is a big planing hull design with a relatively high sail area/displacement ratio. Those ratios are 47.6 and 40.8 respectively and result in an exciting but fairly demanding boat to sail, one that is not very forgiving of a beginner's mistakes.

For those unfamiliar with the term, sail area/displacements can be thought of as a sailboat's horsepower rating. The higher the sail area/displacement, the greater the horsepower relative the weight of the boat. Rather docile daysailers, in the 16- to 20-foot range, would be expected to have a sail area/displacement ratio in the mid-20s, while for high-performance racing dinghies that number can exceed 70. In an effort to offer a more manageable family oriented boat, Douglas designed the Flying Scot with the same 191 square foot sail area as the Thistle but she weighs in at 850 lbs., 20 lbs. heavier than the Highlander. The resulting sail area/displacement ratio is 34 and to say the combination was a success would be an understatement.

Still in production more than 5,800 Flying Scots were built between 1957 and 2008. The Flying Scot remains one of the leading one-design classes in the United States as well as Douglas&s most successful design.

In 1957, Douglas, who had been one of the principals of Douglas and McLeod Boatbuilders (later Tartan Marine) formed the Gordon Douglas Boat Co. in Ohio to build his new design but soon moved the operation to Western Maryland. Douglas retired in 1971 and sold the business to longtime employee Eric Ammann who, after 20 years of ownership, again sold the business to one of his longtime employees. In 1991 Harry Carpenter bought all the company assets and renamed the company Flying Scot, Inc. This truly unique succession of ownership has resulted in consistant production without interruption.

Unlike the Thistle and Highlander, whose early models were built of cold-molded wood, all Flying Scots are fiberglass constructed and strict one-design class rules dictate how the boats are built. The gelcoat is first sprayed into the mold followed by hand-laid layers of chopped strand fiberglass mat and woven roving fiberglass cloth. Flying Scots have always been built with balsa wood cored composite of the hull and deck. Woven roving is used on both sides of the balsa in the hull layup.

The hull and deck are joined, in a shoebox fashion, using bolts on 12-inch centers and then additionally joined on the inside with fiberglass cloth and resin. This results in a very strong, stiff hull and deck, albeit relatively heavy. As testimony to the strength of their boats, Flying Scot proudly boasts that hull #1, built is 1957, is still going strong. Class rules prohibit Flying Scots from having auxiliary power and most have none. For sailors who are not competing, a small gas or electric outboard can be mounted on a transom bracket. Although the Flying Scot may not cause as many white knuckle moments as Douglas's Thistle and Highlander models, that is not to say her performance is boring or sluggish. Typically raced by a crew of three with a mainsail, jib and spinnaker, the Flying Scot easily planes when reaching and running in a stiff breeze & there are few sailing experiences more exciting. For daysailing, the Flying Scot easily accommodates a family of five or six. There are active Flying Scot fleets throughout the country and new owners are likely to find plenty of great sailors willing to welcome new sailors to their ranks and very willing to share their knowledge and experience.

Few would argue that many of the best sailors began as dinghy sailors. It would be hard to beat a Flying Scot as the place to start.

Flying Scots

Naval architect Jack Hornor was the principal surveyor and designer for Marine Survey & Design, Co., based in Annapolis, MD. He was on the boards of the American Boat and Yacht Council, the National Association of Marine Surveyors, and the Society of Boat and Yacht Designers. He and his wife sailed their Catalina 42, Legacy, based on Maryland's Eastern Shore.

Tags: Belle Haven Marina, Flying Scot, sailing, Mariner Sailing School

Why US Sailing?

Posted by George Stevens on Tue, Feb 25, 2014 @ 02:59 PM

The US Sailing Advantage-Accomplished sailors start here.

You dream of learning to sail and charting a course to an adventure of your own. We offer the superior instruction that will make that dream escape a reality.

US Sailing is the National Governing Body for the sport of sailing and accredits only the top schools in the country. We have been serving sailors since 1897, and our commitment to our more than 44,000 members is to provide a safe, fun and successful experience.

Our programs support recreational, cruising and racing sailors in the United States. We developed a certification system that makes learning to sail easy and fun. All of our certification level programming is designed to help you learn safely and with confidence. Our educational materials are created by dedicated volunteer experts who share their passion and knowledge of sailing and education.

The US Sailing Keelboat Certification System offers you:

  • US Sailing instructional materials to help you gain competency and confidence in your sailing skills.
  • US Sailing certification as proof of your achievement and your passport to chartering boats locally or worldwide.
  • US Sailing membership that makes you part of the National Governing Body for the sport of sailing and a community of thousands of fellow sailors.
  • US Sailing certified instructors for professional attention to your safety and learning.

 

Start Sailing

 

Tags: Belle Haven Marina, Learn to Sail, Mariner Sailing School, Sailing Instructors

Belle Haven Marina Schedules Celebration of Welcome to the Water on National Marina Day, June 8th, 2013 (9am – 12 pm)

Posted by George Stevens on Thu, May 30, 2013 @ 11:58 AM

describe the imagedescribe the imagedescribe the image

Alexandria, VA.June 8th, 2013 (9am – 12 pm).

 

As part of a nationwide observance, Belle Haven Marina is celebrating Welcome to the Water on National Marina Day on June 8th, 2013 from 9am till noon.

“Welcome to the Water on National Marina Day is a celebration of boating,” said Belle Haven Marina’s President, George Stevens. “As families search for fun outdoor activities that everyone can enjoy we want to encourage them to give boating a try. Existing boaters are always ready to celebrate with a day on the water, but on this day we ask them to bring a non-boater out to share the experience. We hope you will visit Belle Haven Marina, learn about your boating, and enjoy the events we have planned.”

 

Belle Haven Marina’s Welcome to the Water on National Marina Day activities include:

 

ü      Free 30 minute canoe and kayak rentals

ü      Free 45 minute sailing lessons, 4 per boat with an instructor

ü      Free 30 minute standup paddle board rentals

 

Participants should register by June 5th by calling the marina (703) 768-0018

 

"Now, more then ever, Americans need outdoor, safe, family-friendly ways to spend their leisure time. Welcome to the Water on National Marina Day introduces boating as just such an activity and reminds our existing customers and our community that Belle Haven Marina is a local, environmentally-friendly, beautiful gateway to on-the-water fun."

 

Welcome to the Water on National Marina Day is produced by the Association of Marina Industries, and Discover Boating. For more information, visit www.nationalmarinaday.org.

 

Belle Haven Marina / Mariner Sailing School  www.saildc.com

 

Tags: Belle Haven Marina, Learn to Sail, Potomac River sailing, boating safety, Clean Marina, Mariner Sailing School